Truth Be Told, Documentary about Jehovah’s Witness

Originally posted on Believers vs Non-Believers:

TRUTH BE TOLD is the new feature-length documentary about growing up in the Jehovah’s Witnesses religion. The title refers to the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ perception that their beliefs are ‘the truth.’

TRUTH BE TOLD lifts the veil on the seemingly benign Jehovah’s Witnesses religion to expose a profit-driven, isolationist culture characterized by fear, totalitarian corporate leadership, intellectual & spiritual intimidation, suspension of critical thinking, failed prophecies, doctrinal inconsistency and improper handling of physical and sexual abuse allegations within the church.

See former Jehovah’s Witnesses candidly discuss growing up inside the religion. They reveal experiences including the effects of proselytizing door-to-door, shunning non-observant family and friends, suffering the discouragement of pursuing dreams like gaining a higher education, missing other societal holidays and customs. And more…

Ultimately the film reveals why Jehovah’s Witnesses have the lowest retention rate of any religion with only 37% of those raised as Jehovah’s Witnesses continuing their affiliation…

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Do All Jehovah’s Witness Parents Demand Their Children Earn Their Love?

aislynnrain:

How horrible to have your own mother speak this way to a child.

Originally posted on JWVICTIMS.ORG:

Recently a woman posted a letter on Facebook that her Jehovah’s Witness mother sent to her back when the daughter was only 13 years old. From what I can gather, the daughter was living with her non-JW father at the time. The letter is a stellar example of how emotionally and mentally abusive Jehovah’s Witness parents are to their children, demanding that they actually earn a parent’s love by believing in their god and their religion.

I have permission from the letter’s owner to post it here so you can read it for yourself, in its entirety:

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good teacher another student

What Defines a Wo/Man?

In one of my very first relationships, I dated a man nearly 10 years my senior.  To me, no one could be wiser than him.  He would often call me “Lady” because, according to him, “anyone can be a woman, but it takes a special class of woman to be a lady.”   It was that relationship that helped define who I would become as I matured as it lasted nearly a decade.  I realize today that the lady I am is strengthened by the woman that I am.  

As I cruise around various social media sites and read posts made by my peers, I see a lot of examples of people hating on each other and trying to make oneself better than others, the “one-up game”.  They find out one little speck of dirt about you or your past and they blow it up into Drama World War Kazillion.  I know with my mental illnesses I have a superiority complex, but at least I recognize it and try my best to keep it under control and remember that I’m just a speck of dirt on this rock floating in space.  When I am confronted by people with this need to be better than their fellow man I get aggravated by their haughty high and mighty attitude and I try to keep my dealings with them civil.  Yet, every so often, I feel like I’m backed into a corner with this pious attitude and they will say something that just finally lights the fuse.  And that’s when the smart-ass, Irish ginger, ADHD driven, addicted to learning, pay it forward always to those who deserve, kiss my ass bitch comes out in me.  

See, I know that that sounds ridiculously pompous of myself.  But I have always held the belief that if it is in my power to help others, then I need to do so.  I pay it forward as a way of saying thank you to those who have helped me in the past, especially those who never even knew me.  And I’m a firm believer in karma, what you put out into the universe is what is going to come back to you.  There’s nothing really cosmic about it when you think about it truthfully.  Just the way things should be.  I don’t go around bragging about the things I’ve done, good or bad.  I talk about them, yes, but it’s most likely because it’s relevant to what is being said.  I don’t like to bring attention to myself in such a way but there has been times that I have exploded and “bitch-slapped” someone with proof of my “good deeds”.  I back my stuff up.  When I’m wrong, I admit it.  I do make apologies to people when I am wrong (though many will tell you that it’s not easy to get me to say “I’m sorry” but they know that I’m apologizing the best I can) and I don’t lie to people because I completely believe that the act of lying hurts worse than the lie itself.  

I saw a meme some time ago that said something along the lines of a “real woman uplifts other women and does not berate them”.  That’s a tough one for me.  I am a cynical person, and as I often tell people who are not use to dealing with me on a day to day basis, I have a very acidic tongue.  But if people get past the acidity in my tone and listen to the words and what I am saying, they see that I am also explaining and teaching while doing so.  When I was younger we called that “constructive criticism”.  I have been working on that acidity lately more than I ever did before because not all of my friends can see that that’s just what I’m used to in my life – straight forward real talk, no sugar coating.  Nearly 40 years old and I feel like I’m learning how to socialize with the neighborhood kids again.  

I try to teach by example to others.  With my chaotic mind, I’m sure that that’s a joy.  People always want me to share my recipes or teach them how to make certain dishes.  Okay, well while I’m showing them, I’m explaining things of why I’m doing certain things a certain way.  I’ve learned how to cook and bake from some wonderful cooks in my life and I’ve employed everything that they taught me and people are always telling me how wonderful my food is.   I use this as an example of how I try to always be teaching others.  And I love to have the roles reversed as well.  A good teacher is always another teacher’s student.  

 

So I guess to me, what defines a woman is who she is on the inside, the woman that her closest friends see.  

And with that, I bid you goodnight.  

 

At The Very Beginning…

Originally posted on And Everything Nice:

I have spent years planning this blog, thinking about it, tagging events in my life to use as fodder for blog entries. Let’s dive right in!

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So, this was me.  I was the fourth of five children born to very poor, very religious parents.  My father was a remarkably absent parent for a father who was right there in my home every night and weekend of my childhood.  When I try to summon the memories of him being there, I just can’t bring them to mind.  He was and remains a devout Jehovah’s Witness.  Other than bringing us to attend religious services, I don’t remember him really recognizing or acknowledging my presence.  My mother was left with the child care.  She could be loving and affectionate, but was overwhelmed and occasionally physically abusive.  I grew up trying not to attract much attention.

For those not familiar with the Jehovah’s Witness…

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J.F Rutherford and the date 1925 by Jason Wright

Originally posted on Watchtower Investigated UK:

millions leaflet

In this study we will be investigating the date 1925 in Watchtower Chronology. How was the date arrived at? Who believed in this date? What was expected on this date? Do modern day Jehovah’s witnesses uphold this date? These are some of the questions we will explore. The overall goal is to ascertain if 1925 is a prophetic and biblically credible date.

As with any investigation primary source material is advantageous. This should have been readily available from the official WBTS website www.jw.org however a quick search through the online Watchtower library uncovered very little information on the date 1925 cf. http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/s/r1/lp-e?q=1925&p=par

As can be ascertained from a perusal of the above link, most references to 1925 relate to personal testimonies. References to the actual prophetic date 1925 are limited and many of the official links are defunct – perhaps willfully so? This limited access to WBTS history forms a…

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If Child Molestation is Not a Problem With Jehovah’s Witnesses, Why Do They Need to Ask About It?

Originally posted on JWVICTIMS.ORG:

Jehovah’s Witnesses keep many of their policies and procedures secret from their rank-and-file members, including the procedure they follow when selecting men to be elders. These procedures are found in a book called “Shepherd the Flock of God,” a super-secret handbook meant for the eyes of elders only, a copy of which I have. Before appointing men to be elders, they ask them three questions, as shown below:

new elders

Note these are the only questions they ask before making this appointment and announcing it to the congregation.

Just How Common Is This?

I find it interesting that they need to ask this question about child sexual molestation of any man who is an active, faithful member of the congregation in good standing. To me, this speaks volumes as to how common this type of behavior is, or else they wouldn’t need to ask about it in the first place!

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Jehovah’s Witness Elders Ask Child Rape Victim How Far Apart Her Legs Were During Her Attack

Originally posted on JWVICTIMS.ORG:

Just when I think I’ve heard it all when it comes to how Jehovah’s Witnesses have been handling accusations of child rape in their organization, another story comes out that turns my stomach and causes the rage to bubble over. This latest story is from the Berry congregation in the U.K., where elder Mark Sewell was recently convicted of a string of sexual crimes including rape. In court it was revealed that Sewell consistently uses his position as an elder to force young women into lurid behavior, including giving them topless massages, rubbing his groin against them, and forcing them to kiss him. He also outright raped one woman who became pregnant with, and later miscarried, his child.

As the women finally came forward as adults, the other elders in the Berry congregation resisted legal orders to reveal what they knew of the case and were forced to testify by subpoena alone. They…

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